CEs On A Stick

Come One, Come All! CEs on a Stick is back at Peters Hall on the University of Minnesota’s St. Paul campus – a stone’s throw from the Minnesota State Fair ground.

This year Clinical Supervision is a main event. There are 30 CE Hours in five days for those ready to become licensing supervisors with the Board of Social Work. Supervision Fast Track, indeed! Clinical supervisors are encouraged to experience the Secondary Traumatic Stress workshop to build their own awareness and learn tools to support their supervisees.

For those looking to enhance their practice, you will find workshops to broach such critical topics like Cannabis Use for Adolescents, Sexuality and Sexual Health, and a Whole-Person Approach to Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder centering the voice of a person with lived experience.

Finally, there is a deep dive into the latest version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual – time to prepare for that licensure exam or refine your diagnostic know-how.

We look forward to welcoming you to another Great CE Get Together!

Monday, August 12

8:45am - 4:15pm (CST)

The Ethics of Supervision: Utilizing a Decision-Making Model to Navigate Rough Waters

Michael Van Wert, MPH, MSW, LICSW

This workshop builds capacity for supervisors to engage in self-reflective and discernment practices particularly as it relates to ways cultural identities, power, and privilege can inform ethical decision-making utilizing various decision-making models.

After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Reflect on how identities and power have influenced one’s personal ethical principles and moral compass.
  • Understand characteristics, roles, and responsibilities of ethical and competent supervisors.
  • Understand basic terms, concepts, and theories in ethics.
  • Recognize components of various professional codes of ethics.
  • Understand and apply ethical decision-making models, particularly those rooted in transcultural and feminist models, to practice cases.
8:45am - 12pm (CST)

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD): Understanding with a Holistic, Whole-Person Approach

Dan Neumann, MSW, LICSW; Amy Harbourne

A holistic, whole-person approach to empathize with, screen, diagnose and treat Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder will be explored. A person living with OCD will be co-facilitating giving meaningful insights to participants.

After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Describe what OCD is (and is not), including how to screen for diagnostic criteria.
  • Understand what it’s like to have OCD and how professionals can be most supportive.
  • Identify the most common evidence-based treatment interventions.
  • Describe what “family accommodation” is and why it seems counter-intuitive to family and friends of someone with OCD.
8:45am - 4:15pm (CST)

Understanding the DSM-5-TR: Working In, Around, and Against (Day 1)

Katrina Cisneros, MSW, LICSW

This collaborative, restorative learning space will promote the consideration of working in, around, and against the DSM 5-TR as well as ways to think about differential diagnosis and clinical assessment through a trauma responsive and anti-oppressive lens.

After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Expand their knowledge and skill in differential diagnosis utilizing the DSM system.
  • Understand the importance of anti-oppressive and trauma responsive practice as it relates to diagnostic processes. 
  • Recognize symptom presentations as criteria and understand diagnostic terminology.

Tuesday, August 13

8:45am - 4:15pm (CST)

Understanding the DSM-5-TR: Working In, Around, and Against (Day 2)

Katrina Cisneros, MSW, LICSW

This collaborative, restorative learning space will promote the consideration of working in, around, and against the DSM 5-TR as well as ways to think about differential diagnosis and clinical assessment through a trauma responsive and anti-oppressive lens.

After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Expand their knowledge and skill in differential diagnosis utilizing the DSM system.
  • Understand the importance of anti-oppressive and trauma responsive practice as it relates to diagnostic processes. 
  • Recognize symptom presentations as criteria and understand diagnostic terminology.
8:45am - 4:15pm (CST)

Core Competencies in Clinical Supervision: Crucial Concepts and Skills (Day 1)

Christina Haddad-Gonzalez, MSW, LICSW

Geared toward both new and experienced supervisors, this course focuses on developing, strengthening, and applying essential competencies for effective supervision. Foundational concepts, strategies, and skills will be introduced and practiced in this highly engaging and interactive two-day workshop.

After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Identify, differentiate, and implement supervisory skills related to administrative and supportive supervision.
  • Identify modalities to increase awareness and staff centered practices.
  • Engage in skills of supervisory practice including reflective listening, holding to focus, and maintaining race and trauma informed boundaries with supervisees.
  • Distinguish skills necessary for informed supervisory practice, addressing performance and decision making issues, and boundary issues.
  • Evaluate their own supervisory experiences and styles in order to inform their developing supervisory styles.

Wednesday, August 14

8:45am - 4:15pm (CST)

Core Competencies in Clinical Supervision: Crucial Concepts and Skills (Day 2)

Christina Haddad-Gonzalez, MSW, LICSW

Geared toward both new and experienced supervisors, this course focuses on developing, strengthening, and applying essential competencies for effective supervision. Foundational concepts, strategies, and skills will be introduced and practiced in this highly engaging and interactive two-day workshop.

After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Identify, differentiate, and implement supervisory skills related to administrative and supportive supervision.
  • Identify modalities to increase awareness and staff centered practices.
  • Engage in skills of supervisory practice including reflective listening, holding to focus, and maintaining race and trauma informed boundaries with supervisees.
  • Distinguish skills necessary for informed supervisory practice, addressing performance and decision making issues, and boundary issues.
  • Evaluate their own supervisory experiences and styles in order to inform their developing supervisory styles.
8:45am - 4:15pm (CST)

Where Do We Start?: A Primer to Put Transformative Justice and Community Accountability into Practice

Sara Pournoor (they/he)

In this workshop, participants will learn a brief history of transformative justice, understand the connection between the prison and medical industrial complex, and emotional wellbeing. Participants will walk away with intervention tools and community resources for addressing harm and violence through non-punitive accountability.

After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Define and deepen understanding of the history of transformative justice.
  • Understand how systems, the prison industrial complex, and the medical industrial complex impact quality of life.
  • Identify local and national organizations who share these values and practices.
  • Practices tools from transformative justice.

Thursday, August 15

8:45am - 12pm (CST)

Putting Sex Positive Values into Action: Broaching Sexuality and Sexual Health Skillfully

Emily Gus, MPH

Sexual health is important to many people across the lifespan. This workshop seeks to help practitioners self-reflect on their own hesitancies to broach this topic as well as provide key concepts, skills, and resources to engage in sex positive, non-judgement discussions.

After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize their role in initiating conversations about sexuality and sexual health with clients.
  • Discuss hesitancies around addressing sexuality topics with clients.
  • Define intersectionality and sex positivity to apply to human behavior and sexuality.
  • Identify the various components of human sexuality through the lifespan.
  • Generate relevant questions and resources to discuss sexuality and sexual health with clients.
1pm - 4:15pm (CST)

Addressing Adolescent Cannabis Use in Clinical Settings

Ken C. Winters, PhD

Build your knowledge about the properties of cannabis so you can best educate adolescents and their caregivers as Minnesota becomes the next state to legalize its recreational use. Practitioners in any setting serving families and youth are encouraged to attend.

After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Enhanced knowledge regarding core health- and medicinal-related issues of cannabis use and youth.
  • Enhanced skills with effective approaches and techniques when educating teens regarding cannabis use issues.
  • Stronger skills for supporting parents with an adolescent in treatment who seek to be effective preventionists in the home.  
  • Appreciation of addressing adolescent cannabis use in the context of various ethnic/racial backgrounds​, cultures and community standards.

 

8:45am - 4:15pm (CST)

Grasping Fog: The Reflective Use of Self and its Application in Clinical Supervision

Angie Lewis-Dmello, MSW, LICSW

The concept, process, and ethical considerations of “use of self” in the context of clinical supervision will be explored in this interactive, applied workshop. Participants will gain tools to facilitate their own and supervisees’ self awareness.

After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Identify personal attributes, beliefs, and potential triggers that influence the ways they function as a professional supervisor.
  • Examine important ethical and clinical consequence of self-awareness and self- influence on supervisory effectiveness.
  • Apply tools for identifying and evaluating reactions to supervisees.
  • Recognize how interpersonal dynamics in the supervisory relationship are often replicated in the supervisee’s relationships with clients.
  • Employ strategies for addressing personal insecurities that may limit supervisory effectiveness.
  • Understand how the supervisor’s use of self can be a catalyst for professional growth and improved performance by the supervisee.
8:45am - 4:15pm (CST)

Hope for the Heavy Heart: Recognizing and Healing Secondary Traumatic Stress (Day 1)

Katrina Cisneros, MSW, LICSW

A variety of reflective activities will facilitate participants’ exploration of what STS is and is not. In this collaborative space, we will consider how to mitigate the impact of STS for ourselves and supervisees and find hope amid the suffering.

After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize signs, symptoms, and risk factors for Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS).
  • Understand how culture, race, gender, other identities, lived experiences, systemic oppression, and implicit bias impact STS.
  • Learn strategies to reduce the impact of STS.
  • Identify how to support yourself, your team and/or supervisees in safely sharing the emotional experience of trauma work.

Friday, August 16

8:45am - 4:15pm (CST)

Hope for the Heavy Heart: Recognizing and Healing Secondary Traumatic Stress (Day 2)

Katrina Cisneros, MSW, LICSW

A variety of reflective activities will facilitate participants’ exploration of what STS is and is not. In this collaborative space, we will consider how to mitigate the impact of STS for ourselves and supervisees and find hope amid the suffering.

After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize signs, symptoms, and risk factors for Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS).
  • Understand how culture, race, gender, other identities, lived experiences, systemic oppression, and implicit bias impact STS.
  • Learn strategies to reduce the impact of STS.
  • Identify how to support yourself, your team and/or supervisees in safely sharing the emotional experience of trauma work.
8:45am - 4:15pm (CST)

Beyond 101: Negotiating and Utilizing 'Self' in Supervisory Relationships: Intersections of Culture and Power

Christina Haddad-Gonzalez, MSW, LICSW

During this interactive workshop, practitioners will process intercultural and power dynamics inherent to the supervisory relationship and experience models of practice that serve as tools for engaging difference. 

After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Process identity development with other participants in terms of how this informs their work.
  • Distinguish theoretical information about interculturalism and power and its correlation to practice.
  • Experience models of practice and personal narrative that serve as tools for engaging difference.
8:45am - 12pm (CST)

Communicating Across Power and Difference in Supervision: Finding What Works

Kelsey McCarston, MSW, LICSW

This workshop is designed to help clinical supervisors communicate more effectively while keeping power and identity within the supervision relationship at the fore.

After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Apply practical tools and techniques in increase effective communication with supervisees.
  • Learn “do’s” and “don’ts” of communicating with supervisees.
  • Identify opportunities to use various communication strategies within the supervision dynamic.
  • Recognize the position of power a supervisor has and be able to communicate openly and intentionally with supervisees about this dynamic.
  • Engage effectively across difference in the supervision dynamic.

Pricing and Registration

Participants have the option to select the training workshops they are interested in attending during registration checkout.

Register Today!

$75 - $750 Register